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Roaring Fork River

Courtesy of Roaring Fork Conservancy

The Roaring Fork Conservancy works to educate people on exploring and protecting its watershed. This year’s Roaring Fork Watershed Photo Contest reflects the organization's mission.

Local printmaker Curt Carpenter’s exhibition “Woodcuts of the Roaring Fork River” went up Friday night at The Art Base in Basalt. This exhibition is a scavenger hunt of sorts.

Valley Roundup, June 23, 2017

Jun 23, 2017

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

Joining me in the studio this week are Brent Gardner-Smith, executive director of Aspen Journalism and Andy Stone, former editor of the Aspen Times, as well as Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent speaking via Skype.

Valley Roundup, June 16, 2017

Jun 16, 2017

 

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

 

Joining me this week are David Krause, editor of the Aspen Times, Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent, Roger Marolt, columnist for the Aspen Times and the Snowmass Sun, and Olivia Oksenhorn, Aspen Public Radio’s summer intern.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy / Aspen Public Radio

Water levels on the Roaring Fork River are expected to rise next week as Twin Lakes Reservoir reaches capacity.

Aspen Public Radio

The Roaring Fork River is on Colorado’s list of impaired rivers, so City of Aspen officials are working on a plan to improve the health of the waterway. In the third conversation of a series, environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy and producer Christin Kay discuss how homes and businesses have damaged some of the important areas riparian along the river.

Courtesy of City of Aspen Parks and Engineering

The Roaring Fork is on Colorado’s list of impaired rivers. City of Aspen officials are working on a plan to improve the health of the Roaring Fork River.

The Dial- May 9, 2017

May 9, 2017

Even though the section of the Roaring Fork river that flows through Aspen is rushing as snow melts in the high mountains, state and local officials say that low flows are a problem here.  Christin and Elizabeth Stewart-Severy discuss what this means and some creative solutions that might help keep the river healthy. 

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Low flows in the Roaring Fork have state and local officials concerned about the health of the river, but city officials have some creative ideas for fixes. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been following the issue and spoke with Christin Kay about it.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

The Roaring Fork River running through Aspen is not as healthy as the city or the state think it should be, and now is the time for action.  

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

Recent genetic studies on native cutthroat trout in Colorado revealed a previously unrecognized subspecies in the Roaring Fork Valley — one that is so new it still doesn’t have a name. As part of the Naturalist Nights environmental speaker series, Kendall Bakich with Colorado Parks and Wildlife will discuss how understanding the history of these trout can help preserve species diversity.

Courtesy of Mark Duff

The U.S. Forest Service has taken initial steps to sell two properties totaling about 70 acres of land adjacent to Crown Mountain Park and the Roaring Fork River in the mid-valley. The move comes as the agency works to reduce costs amid funding cuts.

Valley Roundup for July 8, 2016

Jul 8, 2016

  Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

In its attempt to get more social media followers, the Aspen Police Department had a bit of fun with the resort’s reputation as a party town.

Small plastic bag found at grocery store checkout causes internet stir

And time will tell if two developers who want to build lodging at the base of Aspen Mountain can play well together.

Credit Elise Thatcher

A 58-year-old man died after a rafting accident in Aspen on Wednesday. The rafter died after falling from a raft into the Roaring Fork River.

Roaring Fork River will roar this week

Jun 13, 2016
Carolyn Sackariason/Aspen Public Radio News

Thanks to a wet spring, the Roaring Fork River in the coming days will see even bigger flows than this past weekend’s peak runoff levels. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

 

The Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Company has notified local governments that the Twin Lakes Reservoir will reach capacity on Wednesday, which means there will be no diversions to the Front Range starting today.  

April Long, the city’s clean river program manager, said higher flows could last up to three weeks, which is a good thing.

Basalt whitewater park: simple or gathering place?

Jan 21, 2016
Elise Thatcher

There’s a whitewater park in the works near Basalt, and the key is now figuring out how many amenities it should have.

Hunter Baar

 

Results are in from testing done after a release of water from Grizzly Reservoir last month turned the Roaring Fork River a dirty yellow.

The discoloration happened in mid-August after a dam problem forced the release of between 10 and 20 acre feet of water from Grizzly Reservoir on Independence Pass. The water flowed into Lincoln Creek and eventually into the Roaring Fork River. It raised alarm because of its color.

Twitter @IamMBB

On Thursday, City of Aspen and Pitkin County staff took water and sediment samples at Grizzly Reservoir following discoloration of the Roaring Fork River. The work follows concerns from elected leaders.

The crystal clear water turned brown early this week after a dam problem forced the release of muddy water from Grizzly Reservoir. Between 10 and 20 acre feet flowed from Lincoln Creek into the Roaring Fork River.

Cornelia Carpenter

Bugs and wildlife are benefiting from higher-than-normal rivers in the Roaring Fork watershed. Heavy rain and snowmelt have boosted flows to flood stage in some areas. It’s positive for the river ecosystem.

River flows are above average on the Roaring Fork, Frying Pan, Crystal and Colorado rivers. It’s good news for water quality and wildlife habitat along the riverbanks. The flows knock away dirt buildup in the spaces between rocks on the riverbed. Rick Lafaro with the Roaring Fork Conservancy says that’s where bugs live.

Mountain Edition - June 18th, 2015

Jun 18, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Snowmelt combined with recent rains have boosted rivers to dangerous levels.

It takes a lot to get Aspen ready for the Food and Wine Classic. We’ll hear about the final preparations.

And, the publisher of Food and Wine magazine says Aspen’s fest is different from others held around the country.

A conservation group is concerned about a proposed oil and gas lease swap in the Thompson Divide.

And, a local non profits helps low income homeowners become energy efficient.

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