Roaring Fork River

Marci Krivonen

A committee charged with brainstorming redevelopment ideas for downtown Basalt presented their findings on Thursday evening. The Downtown Area Advisory Committee met with Town Council, the Planning and Zoning committee and scores of interested citizens. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

The volunteer committee has been meeting regularly since October and pouring over ideas from the community and a map of downtown Basalt. Basalt is considering redeveloping several key parcels, including some riverfront acreage.

www.ourtownplanning.org

Tonight (Tues 9/23) the Basalt Town Council will decide whether to approve members of a special board that will help make decisions on downtown development. The committee would, according to the Town Manager, “put more meat” on redevelopment ideas. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

Marci Krivonen

If you’ve driven through downtown Basalt recently, it’s hard to miss the mess of trees, electrical boxes and garbage covering a central stretch of land. It’s the site of the old Pan and Fork Mobile Home park, where more than 300 people used to live. The Town of Basalt helped those residents relocate and now it’s focusing on redeveloping the five acres. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen walked through the area with Town Manager Mike Scanlon.

www.colorado.com

A new list names the Upper Colorado River basin the second most endangered stretch of water in the country. The conservation group American Rivers released its annual “top-10” list Wednesday and local rivers like the Roaring Fork and Frying Pan are part of basin that’s threatened.

"All of these rivers have potential targets on them for more diversions," says Ken Neubecker, a coordinator for American Rivers.

Rocky Mountain Institute

The non profit Rocky Mountain Institute is moving forward with plans to build an “Innovation Center” in downtown Basalt. The organization submitted a sketch plan to Town Council last month and if council supports it, construction could start in the fall. RMI specializes in sustainability and energy efficiency and the structure near the Roaring Fork River, will be highly efficient. The $15 million building will be double the size of the group’s current headquarters in Old Snowmass.

Google Image/suehess.com

As the state prepares a statewide water plan, a local non profit wants to make sure our rivers and streams in the Valley are protected. Basalt-based Roaring Fork Conservancy is pinpointing environmental values, so, as the state searches for more water to fill growing needs, local waterways stay full. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

In his State of the State address earlier this month Governor Hickenlooper touched on water.

"Now, if words were water, the state would never run dry," he said.

Marci Krivonen

Elected leaders in the Town of Basalt voted last night to explore alternative options for families being relocated from a trailer park. The Town has been offering cash assistance. But, a group called Workers for Justice and Diversity in Basalt says it’s not enough to pay Basalt’s high rent prices. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

The Town of Basalt held a groundbreaking ceremony yesterday for a major river project set to get underway Monday.

The so-called Pan and Fork project will replace a trailer park with a public park and an improved floodway and riverbank. Construction starts in earnest on Monday. Town Manager Mike Scanlon says he wanted to get the word out now.

Sarah Johnson/Roaring Fork Conservancy

The beginning of this week has brought an unusual amount of moisture to the Roaring Fork Valley. Mountains were dusted with snow and rains lifted river levels to flows usually seen in the Spring. Sarah Johnson with the Roaring Fork Conservancy says flows on rivers like the Crystal are dramatically higher than they were this time last year. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with her on Monday.

Marci Krivonen

The relocation of families living in 38 mobile homes in Basalt is moving forward. Last night Basalt’s City Council passed several measures designed to move the residents out of the trailer park as a step towards redevelopment of the property. As Marci Krivonen reports, the meeting room was packed with people on both sides of the plan.

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