Roaring Fork Transportation Authority

Elise Thatcher

Residents in the Roaring Fork Valley pedaled their support for Colorado’s bike to work day yesterday. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher stopped by a RFTA booth with fortification for riders.

  The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority will decide in September whether to approve an updated approach for preserving its rail corridor. RFTA’s Board of Directors had planned on voting on the matter this summer, but instead they’ll delay and spend more time addressing questions and concerns.

Elise Thatcher

A new bus drivers’ union in the area is stretching its wings. Full time drivers with the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority voted in February to start a local chapter of a national transit worker union. Ed Cortez is the President and business agent for the Aspen Local 774 of the Amalgamated Transit Union He sat down with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher to talk about where the union is now.

The Colorado Department of Transportation announced Wednesday its doling out more than 2 million dollars to the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority. 

Most of the money RFTA is receiving comes from the state’s Faster program, which collects money through car registration fees. RFTA’s also getting federal funds. Overall the agency will collect nearly $2.4 million to fund four separate projects.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

With a measles outbreak in several states, more parents in Pitkin County are getting their kids vaccinated.

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority will consider making it easier to comment on a controversial access plan.

The starting bell rings for candidates and ballot measures in Aspen’s May Election.

Snowmass Village starts reviewing proposed changes for Base Village.

We tally up just how recreational pot shops are in the Roaring Fork Valley after a year of legal retail marijuana.


Public transportation is expensive, and officials can have a hard time keeping up with costs. But making sure bus and other services simply continue as they are, is a big goal for officials in Colorado’s Intermountain region. 

Roaring Fork Transit Authority

Bus service in the Roaring Fork Valley will be less frequent starting next Tuesday, September 2nd. It’s part of the usual fall calendar switch for the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority, but the agency is also having its first anniversary with the VelociRFTA bus rapid transit service, or BRT. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher spoke with President and CEO Dan Blankenship.  

Roaring Fork Transit Authority


 More people are riding the bus in the Roaring Fork Valley than ten years ago. That’s according to new data gathered by the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority, or RFTA. The agency conducted a ridership survey in March for the first time in a decade. To learn more, APR's Elise Thatcher talks with transportation expert Jim Charlier. His firm Charlier Associates is reviewing the survey results. One trend he sees is fewer people driving, because more are telecommuting. 

United States Forest Service

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act and the challenges facing wild places today are different than they were in 1964. Some say it’s increasingly difficult to keep these areas wild and to get protection for new wilderness. The White River National Forest manages eight wilderness areas, including the popular Maroon Bells/Snowmass region near Aspen. In part two of our series, Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen examines the challenges facing the wilderness in our backyard.

City of Aspen/Studio B Architects

Next month Aspen City Council will look over final design plans for a remodel of Aspen’s Rubey Park bus depot. The 30-year-old structure sees millions of riders each year and transportation officials say it’s time for an update. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen went to an open house at the bus station and filed this report.