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Roaring Fork Valley

John Sarpa is a long-time local who is a graduate of  the Roaring Fork Leadership program and then served as the President of the Roaring Fork Center for Community Leadership. Often confused for the name of the organization, Roaring Fork Leadership is the 9-month long program that trains professionals in the Roaring Fork Valley to become better leaders, thinkers, and activists in their communities. 

Sarpa shares the history of the organization and its importance today. 

Buddy Program Executive Director, David Houggy, talks about the organization and his vision for the future. The Buddy Program has been expanding its services in Carbondale, and are anticipating more growth in the coming years. 

Buddy Program Board Member and former Big Buddy, Peter Waanders, is joined by his little buddy of 10 years, Egbert Ospina. Waanders and Ospina met almost 14 years ago when Ospina was in 3rd grade. Now studying at American University and set to graduate in spring 2016, Ospina credits Waanders with his success and confidence. The two say their involvement as buddies with the Buddy Program's Community Mentoring Program not only changed their daily lives, but gave them a lifelong friendship.

Lindsay Lofaro is the Assistant Director of the Buddy Program. She discusses the organization's various mentoring programs, including the popular Community Mentoring Program, where adults are paired with little buddies, and the newest program, LEAD, or Leadership through Exploration, Action, and Discovery. 

Sole Lowe is the Buddy Program's Community Program Director and is based out of the Third Street Center offices in Carbondale. She joined the Buddy Program team in 2002 and shares the history and evolution of the mentoring non-profit over the years. 

More information about the Buddy Program and how you can get involved at www.BuddyProgram.org

Marci Krivonen

Dry February weather melted snow in the high country, but snowpack levels are still substantial. A healthy level of snow up high is important for everyone down low, particularly farmers and ranchers. A crew of snow surveyors and high-tech systems are already sending readings about snowmelt. Marci Krivonen explains.

It’s a calm and sunny February day at 8700 feet above sea level. Snow surveyor Derrick Wyle plunges a long metal tube into deep snow on McClure Pass, south of Carbondale.

Sallie Bernard is the Founder and Board President of Ascendigo, and says that the need for providing services to individuals and their families  on the autism spectrum is growing. Bernard is joined by Ascendigo's Executive Director, Hugh Zuker, and Ascendigo's Adult Program Manager, Carly Knauf. 

Learn more about Ascendigo and their programs in the Roaring Fork Valley at www.Ascendigo.org

 Ascendigo Executive Director, Hugh Zuker, discusses the organization's programs and the importance of the organization's work in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Ascendigo is best known for its summer camp.  Through individualized instruction, participants do a host of outdoor activities including hiking, kayaking, water skiing, and rock climbing. Ascendigo also offers an adult enrichment program and a winter sports program.

Ascendigo has been operating out of the Roaring Fork Valley since 2004. Founded by Sallie Bernard, who now serves as the Board President, the autism services organization has grown from a summer sports camp to a nationally known group that offers a range of outdoor sports programs. 

Bernard is joined by Ascendigo's Clinical Coordinator, Sami Henry, M. Ed., BCBA, to discuss the organization's history and programs.  

Marci Krivonen

There’s growing momentum around producing local food in the Roaring Fork Valley. The new group Roaring Fork Beginning Farmers and Ranchers sprung up earlier this year. It targets mostly young people and it’s meant to help new farmers with hurdles like expensive land. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

English in Action Executive Director Lara Beaulieu discusses the challenges facing the organization, as well as her goals for the future. English in Action has a waiting list with almost 100 individuals waiting for tutors - the organization will host a fall volunteer tutor drive in hopes of recruiting almost 80 new tutors.

Learn more about the fall recruitment HERE, and find out more information about English in Action at www.EnglishinAction.org.   

Julie Goldstein is the Board Chair of English in Action. She joined the organization in 2009 when she became a volunteer tutor. She shares her personal experiences in education and as a tutor, and examines the changing trends of immigrant communities in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Visit www.EnglishinAction.org to learn more about how you can become a volunteer tutor. 

In the 1980's, an increasing number of immigrants - predominantly from Mexico and Central America - became a vital part of the Roaring Fork Valley. Some of these new immigrants struggled to learn English and in some cases, cultural divides developed.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Brian Turner

The field of candidates to fill a vacant judge post that serves the Roaring Fork Valley, has been narrowed down. 

English in Action was created in 1994 when the Basalt Regional Library launched its Adult Literacy Program - committed to fostering a diverse community. In 2008, the initiative became a fully independent non-profit organization known today as English in Action.  

Executive Director Lara Beaulieu discusses the organization's history and importance in the Roaring Fork Valley. 

Creative Commons/Flickr/Alice Henneman

The demand is high for local food in the Roaring Fork Valley, but there’s not enough available. Results from a six-month study show a need to increase local food production through supporting new and beginning farmers. Gwen Garcelon heads the Roaring Fork Food Policy Council, which initiated the analysis. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Gwen Garcelon is with the Roaring Fork Food Policy Council. 

When it comes to health, communities in the Midvalley struggle with binge drinking and, just slightly, with obesity. Public health officials are sharing results of a survey with local governments. Jordana Sabella is the Public Health Planner for Pitkin and Western Eagle Counties. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Jordana Sabella is Public Health Planner for Pitkin and Western Eagle Counties. 

For decades the Aspen Valley Land Trust has kept open spaces in the Roaring Fork Valley from being developed. Now, the organization’s director is preparing to step down. Martha Cochran sat down with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. She says the work AVLT has done to permanently preserve land is not just critical for views and historic land uses, like ranching, it’s important for wildlife.

Martha Cochran is executive director of Aspen Valley Land Trust. She’s stepping down at the end of the year, but intends to stay in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Energetics Education is a young non-profit organization based in Carbondale that works to bring energy education programs into high schools. Established in 2014, the organization has one program - Solar Rollers - that gives solar car kits to high schoolers and hosts a competitive race for the school teams in the spring.   

Noah Davis is the executive director of Energetics Education and shares his personal history in energy and education, and what inspired him to start the organization.

Mike Simmons, Chairman of the Aspen Science Center board, and Jackie Francis, Executive Director of the Aspen Science Center, share their vision for the future of the center. The organization hopes to build a science museum where visitors (both locals and tourists) can explore, interact, and discover. 

Learn more about the Aspen Science Center and their summer programs at www.AspenScienceCenter.org

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