Skiing

John Ohail/oakley.com

As the Winter Olympics inch closer, we’re continuing to highlight the Aspen-area athletes who are training for the Games. Ski racer and Aspen native Wiley Maple is a speed demon. Last year, he was clocked going 95 miles per hour down a snowy course. But, Maple is more than just a skier, he loves art. During slow times at competitions, you can find him sketching to pass the time. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Heavy flooding on the Front Range has resulted in a mess. Oil and animal excrement from feedlots have spilled into or near rivers. The flooding put dams on the Front Range to the test as walls of water rushed down canyons and into towns. We’ll talk to the chief of dam safety for the state. The Roaring Fork Valley deals with suicide often more than other Colorado communities. One local non profit is trying to change that. Federal health care reform kicks into high gear next week when people can shop online for insurance. But, even with insurance, some patients struggle to get care. And, every month a Ute Indian spiritual leader leads a sweat in a cavern in Glenwood Springs. We’ll take you to the healing ceremony. And finally, we’ll introduce you to a local winter Olympic hopeful who learned to ride horses before she got on skis.

Mountain Edition - June 20th, 2013

Jun 20, 2013

The pipeline leak in Parachute several months ago has been repaired but the resulting spill is continuing to cause worries. On Sunday, levels of the chemical benzene went up. We ask officials why.

Our science reporter tells us about some heart irregularities that appear to be unique to high level snow skiers.

The Roaring Fork Valley has among the highest number of residents without health insurance in Colorado. As the rollout of Obamacare begins they may… or may not… get insured.

Some black bears seem to be choosing food from town again this year. We’ll talk with an expert about bear behavior and if coming to town is passed down to cubs.

All that and a conversation with painter Don Nice

mill56 - Flickr

The scientific community agrees: exercise does a body good. When comparing a sedentary lifestyle spent on the couch versus being an active cross-country skier, the recommendation from doctors is a no brainer: Go grab those skis! Which is a lesson Aspenites have long taken to heart. But a recent study from Sweden complicates the simplistic “exercise is good” mantra that we are used to hearing.

That's the sound of 15-thousand cross country skiers simultaneously embarking on a grueling 90 km course. This is the Vasaloppet in Sweden.

UpSkiing for More Turns

Jun 12, 2013
Elise Thatcher

It’s summer in the Roaring Fork Valley – but there’s still enough snow for some skiing in the mountains. And one Carbondale resident is still getting after it…without lifts or traditional backcountry skiing equipment. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher recently spoke with Kevin Passmore, who makes something called an Upski.

Logo from 5 Point Film website

Carbondale’s Five Point Film Festival kicks off Thursday. The adventure film event is in its sixth year, but Executive Director Sarah Wood says their mission remains the same.

"We’re continuing to grow, but we’re really centered around our five guiding principles and that’s what five-point stands for, and those are balance, commitment, purpose, humility and respect."

Photo by Dale Atkins/RECCO

This week is a tough one for many in Colorado’s backcountry community. Friends and family are getting used to the idea that five men died in an avalanche near Loveland Pass last weekend. Its the worst event of its kind in Colorado in a half a century.

Adam Schmidt is editor in Chief at Snowboard Colorado Magazine. He was good friends with one of the victims, Gypsum resident Joe Timlin. Schmidt got the call Saturday night that Joe was gone, killed in the avalanche.

“My first reaction was disbelief. Um. I was hoping it was a terrible joke.”

Aspen Skiing Company

Business leaders, including more than a hundred ski resorts, want Washington to do something about climate change. That’s the message signed by business heavyweights like Nike and Starbucks, as well as Aspen Skiing Company and smaller outfits like Monarch Mountain. And it comes after athletes delivered a letter to the White House with a similar theme.

 

 

"Climate change is the biggest economic opportunity, and it’s the right thing to do."

Pages