Spotlight Health

Amanda Boxtel, Bridging Bionics Foundation

Many people already use prosthetics to get around; now robotics is becoming another way to help people move. It’s already the case for a Basalt resident, Amanda Boxtel, who’s been paralyzed below her pelvis for decades. Boxtel is Executive Director of the Bridging Bionics Foundation. She says it’s been important to her to aim for the best quality of life possible. She talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher.

ted.com

Living with a missing limb is difficult, especially if keeps someone from working or taking care of their family. Krista Donaldson is CEO of D-Rev, a nonprofit that designs technology to help with certain problems in developing countries. Donaldson is working on a prosthetic knee that’s affordable and reliable. 

Stanford University School of Medicine

Research around mouse blood has been making the rounds in the news media lately. It even got a moment on NPR’s Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me earlier this month. Scientist and neurology professor Tom Rando is a key player in that research. He’s Director of the Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Rando spoke with APR’s Elise Thatcher, and says the blood research has taken nearly a decade.

Aspen Institute

There’s a big push to get kids more physically active, but some kids are already playing sports regularly-- maybe even too often. As part of our spring series on key health issues, Tom Farrey talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher. He writes for ESPN and directs the Sports and Society program at the Aspen Institute. Farrey says there’s growing concern about kids overdoing it.

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio.

I’m Elise Thatcher, and this is the fourth in our series on critical health issues.

We’re going to explore the state of health and sports these days especially kids’ athletics.

“We put kids in uniform at age three, we got adults screaming on the sidelines at age six, and we create the travel teams at seven and eight…”

We’ll also get the details on research about staying young… using younger blood. You may have already heard about it.

“This research, may suggest that Bram Stoker had ideas ahead of his time.

That was a medical professor named Andrew Randall commenting on the shocking news on what may make us all live forever. Drinking blood?

It doesn’t actually involve children’s blood… but we’ll let our guest explain.

That’s this hour on Spotlight Health.

Brent James/ Institute for Health Care Delivery Research

The Affordable Care Act has changed a lot for doctors and other medical professionals. There are new insurance requirements, potentially lots more patients and the logistics of switching to digital medical records. Doctor Brent James is right in the middle of all of this, fine tuning the answer to an age old problem: how do you take care of patients in a way that’s really effective, but not overwhelmingly expensive? Dr. James is Executive Director of the Institute for Health Care Delivery Research in Salt Lake City. As part of our spring series on key health issues, James talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher.

feministing.com

Good afternoon, this is Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio. This is the third of six episodes in our series on key health issues.

Today we’ll untangle why seeing a doctor can be so confusing...

“Despite all the medical advances, there seems to be increasing controversy about what is the right thing to do, even about your most common conditions.”

We’ll hear one solution for making that whole treatment experience cheaper and more effective, too.

“We estimate that we’re taking at least $400 million per year out of Intermountain’s cost of operation, through better care.

Coming up today on Spotlight Health.

Episode 3 of 6 in a series to explore key health issues with guests also participating in the Aspen Ideas Festival Spotlight: Health programming this summer.

Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Deciding between doctors, treatments, and, surgeries can be exhausting, and often especially hard when juggling a serious diagnosis. Boston Physician Pamela Hartzband noticed this after practicing medicine for years, and she and a colleague have written a book on how to navigate those decisions. It’s called Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You. Dr. Hartzband will speak at the Aspen Ideas Festival this summer. As part of our spring series on key health issues, Dr. Hartzband spoke with APR’s Elise Thatcher. 

CeDAR/University of Colorado Hospital

 Treating drug addictions can be gender specific, and that's part of the therapy at the Center for Dependency, Addiction, and Rehabilitation at the University of Colorado Hospital in Denver. Ben Cort represents the Center, and sat down with APR’s Elise Thatcher. 

feministing.com

Good afternoon, this is Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio. I’m Elise Thatcher, and this is the second episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll find out how gender plays a role in treating drug addicts…our guest has personal experience with tackling inner demons.

“At 26 was a director at an S & P five firm, but I’d never done anything with my recovery, that was separate.”

We’ll also hear from a former Pepsi Executive about why he believes we should feel empowered to choose exercise or fresh fruit over other unhealthy foods and behaviors.

“What I learned in the food industry, is that many of those tobacco prescriptions don’t apply as easily to food.”

That’s coming up... on Spotlight Health.

Episode 2 of 6 in a series to explore key health issues, with guests also participating in the Aspen Ideas Festival Spotlight: Health programming this summer.

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