Wilderness Workshop

Wilderness Workshop

Aspen City Council voted unanimously last night to keep the water rights to build reservoirs on Maroon and Castle creeks. The vote comes despite public opposition.

Sloan Shoemaker, Executive Director of Wilderness Workshop, and Will Roush, Conservation Director of Wilderness Workshop, discuss the organization's role in conserving and protecting public lands today and what the future holds. Challenges include overpopulation and climate change, but the Workshop remains optimistic.

Visit www.WildernessWorkshop.org for more information and links to events and membership. 

Wilderness Workshop Conservation Director Will Roush outlines the two guiding principles the organization uses to conduct their work in protecting the lands of the White River National Forest and surrounding areas.  Peter Hart, Conservation Analyst and Staff Attorney, also contributes to the conversation.  Roush and Hart discuss the Thompson Divide and the BLM's decision to cancel 25 oil and gas leases on the Divide, and the organization's work in forest restoration and water. 

Trailsource.com

Local nonprofit Wilderness Workshop is seeking volunteers for a restoration project on Sunday to remove barbed wire on Buttermilk.

Rebecca Mirsky is the Development Director at Wilderness Workshop, and oversees the Artist in Wilderness Program. The program invites artists for a one-week residency in the Aspen area, where they create art inspired by the places that Wilderness Workshop is working to protect. Mirsky also discusses the organization's summer guided hike series, local lecture series, and volunteer opportunities.

In 1967 three local Aspen women, Joy Caudill, Dottie Fox, and Connie Harvey, came together with two goals: 1. to designate the Hunter-Fryingpan  Wilderness and Collegiate Peaks areas as wilderness, and 2. to double the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness area. 

The BLM’s recent announcement that it’s canceling oil and gas leases in the Thompson Divide has environmentalists applauding the decision and industry executives preparing for litigation. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup are Collin Szewczyk, reporter for the Aspen Daily News, Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, and Randy Essex, editor of the Glenwood Post Independent.

 

You can hear more of the conversation at 3:30 p.m. today.

 

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The City of Aspen is holding a public open house today to discuss its conditional water rights on Castle and Maroon Creeks.

Post-fire weed pull in Hunter Creek on Saturday

Jul 6, 2016
Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Five local organizations are teaming up to organize a community weed pull this Saturday in the Hunter Creek Valley following a prescribed burn in the area in May.

 This is from the Cross Current archives. This program takes an in depth look at the recent prescribed burn in the Hunter Creek Valley, why it was scheduled and what results can be expected.

Courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

A prescribed burn is tentatively scheduled to take place later this month in the Hunter Creek Valley.

Coming up on Cross Currents, weather permitting, there will be a prescribed fire in the Upper Hunter Creek Valley later this spring.

This week on Cross Currents, Dave Foreman, Founder of the environmental movement EarthFirst!, along with Will Roush and Justin Patrick of Wilderness Workshop.

This week on Cross Currents, Wilderness Workshop's Artist in Wilderness Residency Program. Painter Val Rossman, along with Mary Dominick, founder of the program.

Facebook/Protegete:Nuestro Aire, Nuestra Salud

The number of ethnic minorities involved in environmental organizations across the country is dismally low and it’s the same in the Roaring Fork Valley. Some statewide groups have noticed the problem and are creating programs for the Latino community. They say reaching this population is an important step toward reducing carbon emissions. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dulce Saenz immigrated with her family to Colorado from Mexico when she was a toddler. She says she heard the term “carbon footprint” for the first time last year.

Today on CrossCurrents - last month, the federal government released the new Record of Decision on oil and gas leasing on the White River National Forest.  Guests are Will Roush of the Wilderness Workshop and Zane Kessler from the Thompson Divide Coalition.

http://www.wildernessworkshop.org/

http://www.savethompsondivide.org/about-us/mission-and-vision.html

Today on CrossCurrents, Wilderness Workshop is presenting Untrammeled! Wilderness in the Human Era tonight at Paepcke Auditorium.

Guests are Will Roush, conservation director for Wilderness Workshop, Dave Foreman, director of the Rewilding Institute, and Jamie Williams, president of the Wilderness Society.

About the Wilderness Workshop (from the organization's website):

The Wilderness Workshop is the conservation watchdog of nearly 3 million acres of public lands in western Colorado. Using science, the law and grassroots activism, WW works to keep the White River National Forest and nearby BLM lands more or less “as is” and, where possible, to restore wildness to this nationally important landscape.

Founded in 1967, the Wilderness Workshop has earned a national reputation for passionate advocacy, grassroots effectiveness, and scientific authority.

WW is the only nonprofit organization that’s devoted to protecting these particular public lands on a full-time basis. No other local group has the expertise and standing to participate effectively and consistently in the arcane bureaucratic processes that decide the fate of these lands; no state or national organization can devote as much time to our particular area.

We don’t represent any user group; rather, we provide a voice for nature on our public lands. We’re a community of people who enjoy and cherish wild places, and believe that wildlands and wildlife should be protected for their own sake (and for ours).

Although focused on the White River National Forest region, our work is part of a visionary movement to reconnect wildlife habitats and “rewild” landscapes on a continental scale. Thus we frequently partner with other local, state, regional and national groups on projects.

50 Years Of Wilderness: The "Maroon Belles"

Jul 17, 2014
Meredith Ogilby/Wilderness Workshop

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act and, in special series, we're focusing on one protected area in our backyard, the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness.

It took the work of three tireless women to expand protection in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness near Aspen. In 1964, just the high mountain peaks became wilderness. So, the women, called the “Maroon Belles,” worked to more than double the size of the preserved area. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen tells their story.

Of Fire Tents and Hut Trips

Jan 14, 2014
Will Roush

It could be an overly nuanced distinction to folks who don’t live in the mountains and spend much time in the woods, but I’ll make the case anyway: winter camping and hut trips are two very different experiences. One requires a tolerance for cold and a degree of suffering most people would prefer to pass up; the other involves cozy accommodations, light packs and comfy mattresses. Both usually include spectacular winter scenery and close friends.