Aspen Ideas Festival Broadcasts

The Aspen Ideas Festival is an annual week and a half long gathering that offers a variety of programs, tutorials, seminars, discussions and events that bring together vibrant intellectual exchange. Aspen Public Radio is broadcasting several of the events. If you miss it live, you can listen to them here. To check the schedule of live broadcasts this week, click here.

NPR

The Trump Administration says it is “committed to a foreign policy focused on American interests and American national security” and that “the world will be more peaceful and more prosperous with a stronger and more respected America.” Others have called Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris agreement, waffling commitment to NATO, and abandonment of the TPP dangerous acts of isolationism that will create a vacuum of American leadership, and openings for others to reorder the world.

In recent years, the founding fathers have almost become deities—figures to be revered for their role in creating our nation. But do they deserve being ascribed these God-like qualities? After all, many of them were slave owners, had personal lives filled with scandal, and had feuds that impaired their focus on the country. And, almost all of them had serious reservations about democracy and the viability of country they were creating.

Walter Isaacson is fascinated by innovators — the kinds of geniuses whose ideas have transformed industry, science, and society. Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs, and Benjamin Franklin each grabbed his attention in ways that allow us, as readers, to discover the depth and breadth of their brilliant thinking and creative sensibilities.

Aspen Institute

Latino evangelicals — a fast-growing population that is nearing 20 percent of American Latinos, and rising — exemplify the difficult positions many Christians find themselves in today, where social conservatism and deep Christian faith run headlong into hard questions about immigrants, refugees, the poor, and moral leadership. 

 

The annual Aspen Institute Ideas Festival made local and national headlines all week, and there's plenty going on in the communities of Carbondale and Glenwood Springs. Speaking with News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this week are Carla Jean Whitley, an editor for the Glenwood Post Independent via Skype, and Aspen Daily News Editor Curtis Wackerle and Aspen Times Managing Editor Rick Carroll in the studio.

 

 

 

  The Aspen Ideas Festival's signature event hosts an audience of 2,000 in the Benedict Music Tent. Big thinkers and doers will engage serious ideas about their work, our world, and the future.

Aspen Institute

Work, play, privacy, communication, finance, war, and dating: algorithms and the machines that run them have upended them all. Will artificial intelligence become as ubiquitous as electricity? Is there any industry AI won't touch?

Hate groups and hate-fueled incidents are spiking in America. The Southern Poverty Law Center, through aggregating media reports and gathered submissions from its website, recently catalogued 1051 acts of intimidation and hate in the first month after Trump won the presidency. What is the evidence of this rising tide, and what does it look like in our communities? What groups are most frequently targeted today? What theories might explain this rise, and what can Americans who value tolerance do to fight back?

Matt Ferro

The kind of work we do — and the way we do it — has changed a lot over the past 50 years. The modern-day employee is fast, flexible, and mobile. More and more, companies are finding they must enhance their physical environment in order to create the kind of cultural environment that attracts next-generation talent and gives them a competitive edge. 

 The annual Aspen Institute Ideas Festival is in its ninth day and has been making local and national headlines all week. Speaking with News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup this morning are Aspen Daily News editor Curtis Wackerle and Aspen Times managing editor Rick Carroll.

 

 

 

 

Journalists Charles Sykes, Melissa Block, James Fallows and Joshua Johnson have made careers out of asking questions and listening to American voices. Especially over the past year, when we’ve so often been described as deeply and hopelessly divided, what have these keen observers gleaned from thousands of conversations and interactions with individuals around the country? Do they agree with this assessment? What do they find are the best ways to uncover authentic thoughts and feelings beneath oceans of superficial labels and assumptions?

Carolyn Sackariason / Aspen Public Radio news

 

One of the tracks at this year’s Aspen Ideas Festival is “Reimagining the Internet”. News Director Carolyn Sackariason attended two sessions this week that were focused on living in a surveillance economy, and how to protect our personal information.

Ambassador Wendy Sherman, lead negotiator of the Iran nuclear deal, shares takeaways from her experiences working the historic agreement. What does the Iran deal have to teach us about approaching today’s seemingly intractable conflicts?

During this factious time in history, the founder of StoryCorps shares what he's learned from the 400,000 participants in the StoryCorps archive, the largest collection of human voices ever gathered. 

The notion of applying principles of democracy to governance has been around for centuries, increasingly popular as citizens across the globe discover the value of participatory government and the power that it invests in them.

Claire Woodcock

A grand strategy is a framework through which a country like the United States understands its place in the world: its goals, its biggest challenges, and the best way to promote its security and way of life. 

When is the truth the truth, a lie a lie, and what constitutes mere BS in an era that many refer to as “post-truth”? This panel addresses the kinds of critical and largely ethical questions we confront in our modern-day discourse, exploring the intent of the First Amendment (does it protect lies?), the reasons we lie (or, in fact, are we just strategically misleading?), and, through the lens of a lawyer, a fact checker, and a scientist, the ways various of us define and “get to” the truth.

White working class voters without a college education are most vulnerable to diseases of despair, and they are also most likely to have voted for President Trump. This population is deeply concerned about rising health insurance costs, and more likely to lose their health insurance if the Affordable Care Act is repealed. Panelists James Fransham, Sue Curry, Mollyanne Brodie, and Joanne Kenen discuss what we know about the connections between health and politics, and why these connections matter.  

  Responsibility for implementing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), in line with Congressional intent, rests with the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).