Environment News

Aspen Public Radio News

A busy holiday season in Aspen had more people than ever moving through the airport.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The last day to formally challenge the City of Aspen’s conditional water rights on Maroon and Castle creeks was Dec. 31. At least 10 people and organizations are opposing the city in court.

Carolyn Sackariason/Aspen Public Radio News

Christmas trees that have passed their prime may see another life at area landfills.

Courtesy of Rocky Mountain Wolf Project

Montana State Sen. Mike Phillips has been a part of efforts across the country to restore populations of wolves. He was recently involved in their reintroduction to Yellowstone National Park, and is now launching the Rocky Mountain Wolf Project, with a goal of bringing the apex predators back to Colorado. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy sat down with Phillips earlier this month to discuss what wolf recovery in this state could look like.

American Rivers

The City of Aspen has filed to keep conditional water rights on Castle and Maroon creeks because, council members say, the town may one day need water storage. The national advocacy group American Rivers plans to be one of several organizations that will oppose the city in water court.

Courtesy of RFTA

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) has six new buses running on natural gas, and local commuters could continue to see more environmentally-friendly options on the roads.

http://www.energysmartcolorado.com/aspenenergychallenge

As 2016 draws to a close, so does the Aspen Energy Challenge, but the city is continuing work on energy efficiency.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Elected officials have approved the purchase of $7 million worth of conservation easements and land in Pitkin County.

Courtesy of James Swomley

The U.S. Forest Service has a plan to clear cut some sections of the Upper Fryingpan Valley, beyond Ruedi Reservoir. The first round of public comment has ended, and some people are not happy about logging operations in this recreational area.

Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County commissioners voted Tuesday to oppose the City of Aspen’s claim to conditional water rights on Maroon and Castle creeks.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

This holiday season, while trash cans across America overflow with packaging, wrapping paper and discarded gifts, the Pitkin County Landfill faces an even bigger issue: the by-products of luxury building.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

Earlier this fall, Aspen City Council heard loud and clear that residents don’t want to see dams on Castle or Maroon creeks, and then filed to keep the rights to build reservoirs there anyway. Now the city is making good on its promise to explore other options.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) commission yesterday unanimously approved an experimental study to kill black bears and mountain lions in the Piceance Basin near Rifle.

Courtesy of Noah Hoffman

Aspen natives Noah Hoffman and Simi Hamilton, members of the U.S. Nordic Ski Team, have been racing in Europe, but the snow conditions are strikingly bare. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy caught up with the skiers via Skype from their hotel in Switzerland.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

As the Pitkin County Landfill heads toward capacity, the City of Aspen is turning its focus to the largest garbage producer in the valley: construction and demolition projects. But reducing the volume of this trash is no simple matter.

Aspen Public Radio News

Highland Bowl remained closed Monday after a series of large avalanches the day prior.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) commission meets Wednesday to decide whether to kill more mountain lions and black bears near Rifle.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails officials have received a big boost — to the tune of $100,000 — in building a trail between Carbondale and Crested Butte.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Winter cyclists and pedestrians may soon have a wider sidewalk over Castle Creek Bridge as the City of Aspen tries out a snowy version of this past summer’s “living lab.”

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Without snowmaking to fill in nature’s gaps, the chairlifts wouldn’t be running right now. And as Aspen Skiing Company taps area creeks to make it possible, it’s not without concern that it’s depleting natural resources.

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